Simply Noel: January 1 – His Joy in the Wine

Simply Noel:

January 1 – His Joy in the Wine

His joy is in the wine…

I’m not a drinker. I confess, I have been a little envious at times of some of my devout Christian friends who enjoy a good glass of wine from time to time. I realize there are health benefits, and so I’m not opposed to sipping a fine wine with a good meal. But… I. Just. Can’t. I choke it down every time.

So, I am writing this today, not as a knowledgeable person when it comes to wine, but, rather, as a Christian who sees the miracle in the wine.

The account of Jesus’ first miracle has always intrigued me. Why a wedding? Why wine? Why does it seem as though Mary would ask him to perform a parlor trick of sorts in public? I’m sure there are very well-developed theories answering all of those questions, but I’m not a scholar. I am a busy mom to four little people, who loves Jesus and just wants to hear from Him everyday.

One Sunday, during worship, I received the most beautiful thoughts regarding the water turning into wine. I was thinking about communion and how Jesus took the cup (with the “fruit of the vine” Mark 14) and told the disciples that it was His blood, poured out for many.

I thought about the Wedding at Cana and how He most likely used water that was intended for ceremonial washing. This unclean water had miraculously turned into the best wine, out of view from the attendees and relatively in secret. His mother, disciples, and just a few servants were the only people witnessing the miracle taking place.

How fitting to show us a spiritual transformation taking place between a life-giving water that is intended to clean our physical bodies and sustain our lives to a spiritual drink that washes our soul clean and gives us eternal life? Many readers may take the Bible at face value, but I love it when imagery takes hold of my heart and He draws me closer to Him in that way.

I reread that passage over and over afterwards, and a second point caught my eye:

From John 2: 6-11 (Emphasis mine)

6Now there were six stone water jars there for the Jewish rites of purification, each holding twenty or thirty gallons.[a] Jesus said to the servants, “Fill the jars with water.” And they filled them up to the brim.And he said to them, “Now draw some out and take it to the master of the feast.” So they took it. When the master of the feast tasted the water now become wine, and did not know where it came from (though the servants who had drawn the water knew), the master of the feast called the bridegroom 10 and said to him, “Everyone serves the good wine first, and when people have drunk freely, then the poor wine. But you have kept the good wine until now.” 11 This, the first of his signs, Jesus did at Cana in Galilee, and manifested his glory. And his disciples believed in him.

“So they took it.”

Yes, they were servants doing what servants do and following orders, but they were taking washing water to their boss, essentially, to present it as wine.

I believe it was an act of obedience, but maybe it was also an act of faith. They filled the washing pots themselves with water, and they knew what was in the pots. Jesus didn’t touch the water, speak to the water, or even stretch out His hands (as Moses did with the first plague when He turned the water of the Nile into blood). He simply gave the orders, and they listened.

Faith.

Doing what God tells you to do, simply because you are taking Him at His word.

For by grace you have been saved through faith; and that not of yourselves, it is the gift of God;

– Ephesians 2:8

Salvation is His gift to us, given out of grace, since we do not deserve it and can’t earn it. To receive it, we must believe that Jesus is the Son of God and that He died for us and rose again. That takes faith; we receive the miracle of salvation by exercising faith. Much like the servants, we walk to the water, and draw from it, and what we have in return for that faithful obedience is wine – His blood, poured out for many. His blood, that covers a multitude of sins and washes us white as snow, can only be ours if we trust Him.

He endured the cross for the “joy set before Him”; His blood was shed for the joy set before Him…

His joy is in the wine.

Will you drink of it today?

xo,

Kristi

wine

 

Klover House Christmas:

On the eighth Day of Christmas, my true love gave to me, eight maids a milking…

I just love that song (it drives my hubby bonkers). The kids and I belt out “five gold rings” at the top of our lungs. It’s so much fun.

I’ve been reading about the supposed meanings behind each of the gifts in the song, and today, the eighth day, the lover presents the eight maids and they are said to represent the eight Beatitudes given by Christ on during the Sermon on the Mount.

We talk about the Fruits of the Spirit often in our home, but I don’t recall ever teaching the girls about the Beatitudes. I think it is worthwhile to study them for myself, print them out for the kids to see, and start talking with them about who the Lord calls “blessed.”

After all, when the angel Gabriel first addressed Mary in Luke, he referred to her as “highly favored” and “blessed” among women. Wouldn’t it be amazing to hear those words from God himself?

Matthew 5: 1-12

Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. 

Blessed are those who mourn, for they will be comforted. 

Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the earth. 

Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled. 

Blessed are the merciful, for they will be shown mercy. 

Blessed are the pure in heart, for they will see God. 

Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God.  

Blessed are those who are persecuted because of righteousness, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are you when people insult you, persecute you and falsely say all kinds of evil against you because of me. Rejoice and be glad, because great is your reward in heaven, for in the same way they persecuted the prophets who were before you.

Maybe, like me, you haven’t given much thought to sharing these in your home? I hope to *translate* them for my children in such a way that they can apply each to their lives, and, together, we will discover what it means to be “blessed.”

 

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